Big news…

Potentia 2.0 is rolling out this summer!  To better serve our clients,

  • I am moving Potentia to new office space in August. For those who live in SoCal, stay tuned for the date of our open house so you can come by and check it out.
  • A massage therapist is joining Potentia!  A variety of services and packages will be available to complement our other professional services offered under the same roof.
  • To help meet the demand for our specialized services, an MFT intern is also joining the Potentia team.  In addition, she will provide expert support for families of special needs kids.
  • New e-products are in production for students, parents and ministry staff.
  • An updated website that has a video component to feature commentary and interviews on subjects important to the Potentia team will be launching soon.

All of these changes are in support of our mission to (re) define health.  We believe that true health is not based on the numbers on the scale, labeling food good/bad, perfection, what others think.

We are living in a time where the focus on health, food and weight has never been more intense.  In addition, culture is promoting an extremely distorted definition of health, beauty and worth.

Contrary to the messages saturating our world, being healthy is not just about what you eat, how much you exercise, what you weigh.  Health is a mind, body, soul package that cannot be contained in a number.

True health involves caring for your body (in the non-diet kind of way), safe and fulfilling relationships, finding meaning in your life, moving your body with purpose and for fun (not just to burn calories and punish your body), addressing emotional pain and doing the hard work to heal your heart.

Trying to fix emotional pain through food (restrictive or emotional eating), minimizing or denying traumatic experiences, staying in a destructive relationship or shaming yourself because you think you are not enough/not worthy only further infects emotional wounds.

It takes courage to ask for help and strength to live life to the fullest.  And the team at Potentia is ready to partner with you and your community as you seek to (re) define health.

I would love to hear from you.  How do you want to (re) defining health in your life or in your community?

Cheers to a true-health kind of summer.

Rebecca Bass, LMFT


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In the name of Health

In The Name of Health

In the last several weeks, I received news about amazing women I know fighting for health in their lives.  One family member is fighting for her baby’s health as he struggles to eat and maintain his weight, another friend is planning for a radical surgery as a preventative measure against cancer.  A newer friend of mine recently discovered a mass in her lungs and has begun chemo therapy to tackle the cancer in her body.  All three of these women greatly inspire me with their courage, passion and strength.  In their quest for health, they face challenges, uncertainty and a roller coaster of emotion.  Their stories have unwritten chapters ahead of them as they seek to do what is best for their health.  Yet, my work has taught me that our quest for health can look completely different from person to person.

Health (re)defined

Health.  We hear this word a lot: In the news; in commercials for products and diets; in research findings; in schools; on magazine covers with claims of the best in the name of what is healthy. When looking further into the meaning of what all of these voices are calling healthy, I find such a wide-range of definitions.  Marriam-Webster online defines health as the following:

1 a : the condition of being sound in body, mind, or spirit; especially : freedom from physical disease or pain b : the general condition of the body <in poor health> <enjoys good health>

2 a : flourishing condition : well-being b : general condition or state <poor economic health>

If I use this definition as a platform for discussing health, then that leaves many I know operating from a warped and inaccurate view of what is truly healthy.  Many of the men and women I work with are striving for health, but in a way that actually depletes their health body, mind and spirit.  50+ billion dollars annually are spent every year in our country on diet and “health” related products.  Many of these products make a lot of promises but rarely deliver.  Others leave people in bondage so that they are fearful of living life without sticking to a specific plan.

This is a big theme as I seek to propose ways we can (re) define health as we know it.   We crave, hunger, desire for so much more.  Diets, health food, fear of fat, control, deprivation, denying who we are called to be for fear of rejection, alienation are some of the many ways in which we try to manage our pain and our fear.  Yes, we have choices on how we feed, move and care for our bodies and souls.  No, there is not a quick fix to being able to sit with the tension of it all.  But if we are operating from our passions, are in touch with our true identity – not one sold to us – then maybe, just maybe, the diet industry may go out of business (OK, a girl can only hope…) and health, quality health, can be achieved.

(re)Defining Health with Respect

The news is not lacking with stories about the “obesity epidemic” and television shows focusing on radical weight loss in the name of health are very popular. I will add my voice to the discussion on:

  • the disordered eating spectrum,
  • Orthorexia and how the quest for health can turn into a debilitating and often deadly obsession,
  • EDNOS (Eating Disorder not otherwise specified)
  • the HAES (Healthy At Any Size) movement
  • Intuitive Eating and a non-diet philosophy

Challenging various definitions of what is “healthy” can be volatile and feel very personal.  My hope is to respectfully challenge some of the beliefs, philosophies and motivations behind the many definitions of health out there with the goal of moving the discussion away from fear, prejudice and misinformation towards true freedom and health with passion, love and respect. There will be other contributors to add additional perspective to the effort to (re) define health.  Stay tuned.  Some good stuff is coming! I also hope you will join in this important discussion.  Your voice matters.

  • How do you define health?
  • What do think about the struggles of obesity in our culture?
  • Do you think an over emphasis on weight will prevent obesity or create more food and body issues?
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